Shakshuka, The Interestings, and the People With Whom You Eat

A few years ago, deep in the throes of college, I got the chance to go to Israel with The David Project's Israel Uncovered trip. It was a crazy, nutso-wonderful time, and you can read a bit about what I was thinking while I was there in the post I did for their blog back in 2015. One of the things I most loved about it was the group with which we traveled. The David Project did a great job of throwing you into situations where you really had to immerse yourself in uncomfortable situations to grow, and I, a person who squirms when I need to call someone instead of emailing them, grew a lot, and part of this was thanks to a great group of people who also happened to be vegetarian. I spent a lot of time with them, mostly because we ate at our own exclusive table (with a few invite-only guest stars) so as not to contaminate our food with #themeat. We began our "Veggies Table" custom at the place where my Israeli food dreams came true: Dr. Shakshuka in Tel Aviv. 

 Illustration by Caroline Josephine Brown.

Illustration by Caroline Josephine Brown.

Shakshuka, which my dad calls sharkshura, as in made of sharks, is a dish that is best enjoyed with interesting people who are hopefully not sick. There are no separate bowls or forks or spoons; everyone digs in with a hunk of bread and breaks egg yolks and scoops up melty feta cheese together, and it's an honest-to-goodness dinner, the kind that we ~millennials~ just don't have anymore according to a bunch of much older people judging us for our age.

 She even redid the logo with my cats! Ah!

She even redid the logo with my cats! Ah!

The latest group of good people with whom I enjoyed shakshuka included my co-worker / friend / constant source of calm, Caroline Josephine Brown, who illustrated the whole process as a part of #inktober. The drawings you'll find in this week's posts are by her, and I am high key obsessed. Check out her blog for more of her work!